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Randy "Windtalker" Motz

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Since his teens, Randy “Windtalker” Motz has been involved in music, as a performer, live sound engineer, producer and recording engineer. And, though not a confirmed member of any tribe, he is Native American in spirit and has always had a profound interest and passion for Native cultures, traditions, and perspectives on life. However, it was not until the late 1990’s that all of these aspects of his life came together in a profound way, setting the course for a totally new musical career.

This musical and cultural genesis began after attending two distinctively different concerts. The first, by Yanni, was an acoustic journey of ethnic styles brought to life by the powerful blending of a full orchestra and rock instrumentation. The second was a concert by Robert Mirabal, the legendary Native American flute player from the Taos Pueblo. Here the creative inter-weaving of Native American stories and instruments with rock drums, electric guitar, bass and effects-laden cello, captured Randy’s creative imagination. The die was now cast and Randy set out on a new adventure to create what he would later call, Native SoundScapes.

After many years of self-training and tutelage under such noted Native American flute players, as Ron Warren and Clint Goss, and pulling from the musical influences of R. Carlos Nakai, John Huling and Robert Mirabal, “Windtalker’s” style began to take shape and continues to evolve and mature to this day. His blending of flute with lush orchestration, piano, cello, guitar, and Native percussion weaves a unique musical tapestry that is sometimes ethereal, sometimes playful, and oftentimes dramatic. The graceful and winding melodies communicate his passion for Native cultures and traditions, as well as his love of nature; a passion and love solidified during his thru-hike of the Appalachian Trail and travels throughout the U.S. Using a diverse acoustic palette, each song paints a “soundscape” that transforms the spirit, touches the soul, and relaxes the mind.

In 2006, “Windtalker” released his first CD, Native SoundScapes, to universal acclaim. This nine-song album was completely written, performed and recorded by the artist. Two songs from this album have been chosen for the soundtrack of the upcoming independent film, Killing Cavendish.

In 2011, a second CD, Canyon Whispers, was released. It continues to receive high praise for its creativity, production quality, and diversity of music styles that easily fit into not only Native American, but also World, New Age, and Contemporary Instrumental categories. Compositions from this album have received airplay on radio stations such as NativeRadio.com.

Both CDs are available at Amazon.com and CDBaby.

With its range of musical styles, from traditional Native American, to classic rock, blues and jazz, “Windtalker’s” live performances captivate audiences of all ages at festivals, coffee houses, wineries, schools, churches, senior living centers, private parties and other intimate venues. He has also been the guest performer for a moonlight tour held by the National Park Service at New Mexico’s Pueblo Bonito ruins at Chaco Canyon National Historical Park.

What makes “Windtalker’s” performances unique is the use of dramatic photos from the Southwest, Alaska, and the Appalachian Mountains as a backdrop projected on a large screen on stage. His music becomes the soundtrack for these photos, taking the listener on a soothing, and sometimes playful, journey of sight and sound through the grandeur of this country's varied landscapes. Each song melodically captures the essence of these iconic cultural landmarks and mystical landscapes.

Visit www.windtalkermusic.com for more information.

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Discography

Cd_booklet_-_front_only_-_small_size
Canyon Whispers
(released on April 04, 2011)
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Native SoundScapes
(released on December 12, 2006)