Native American Beliefs

This topic contains 13 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by  jackeyj 4 years, 11 months ago.

Viewing 14 posts - 1 through 14 (of 14 total)
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  • #806468

    red hawk
    Participant

    This is mainly directed at James, but I thought all of us might benefit from a discussion of this type.

    I would like to continue what I started in another thread. James said that some will hear and others will not. My question is, then it’s impossible for someone like me to learn? Is there any way it can be broken into simpler parts to make it easier to understand… comprehend. I truly wish to learn, respect, and honor the ways of the people our native American flutes derived from.

    Ginger

    #914514

    pastorclyde
    Participant

    QUOTE(Red Hawk @ Feb 27 2013, 11:08 AM)
    This is mainly directed at James, but I thought all of us might benefit from a discussion of this type.

    I would like to continue what I started in another thread. James said that some will hear and others will not. My question is, then it’s impossible for someone like me to learn? Is there any way it can be broken into simpler parts to make it easier to understand… comprehend. I truly wish to learn, respect, and honor the ways of the people our native American flutes derived from.

    Ginger
    From what I have heard from people that lived near a reservation and spent time with some of the NA that reside and developed close friendships …….. I reckon a person reaps the benefits of their efforts. That being said , for as much nations , tribes/clans and families share in common there are many differences. Not everyone vibrates with the same settings. I have found the more formal the setting the more hoops one is expected to jump through. The more human to human a connection is the easier it is to communicate. What ever reverence you have is yours whether it is recognized or not. Perhaps choosing a specific NA language and dialect would be beneficial , of course that takes some time and that can be in short supply nowadays.

    #914515

    rick mcdaniel
    Participant

    There are Native people who are teachers of Native customs and lifestyle. Those will vary somewhat from one culture to another.

    James is, as I recall, Lakota in ancestry. Other cultures will have similarities, and also marked differences.

    The best way to find someone who does this, is to contact the tribal government of whichever tribe you might like to learn about, and see if there is someone available who you can spend time with, to learn about the culture. Not all cultures will have this available.

    You might have to travel some distance to find that person, as Indiana is not a state with much Native population (.2%). Often there will be some options, in terms of time spent, and lessons taught.

    There is a lot of reading material that will also provide some of that, available from on line sources by tribal affiliation. (For instance Cherokee materials are available from both the Eastern Band, in Cherokee, NC, and the Oklahoma Band, in Tahlequah, OK.)

    You can probably get some guidance on the various cultures, especially in your region, at the Eiteljorg Museum of American Indian and Western Art Indianapolis, IN.

    #914516

    wanbli wiwoope
    Participant

    QUOTE(Red Hawk @ Feb 27 2013, 11:08 AM)
    This is mainly directed at James, but I thought all of us might benefit from a discussion of this type.

    I would like to continue what I started in another thread. James said that some will hear and others will not. My question is, then it’s impossible for someone like me to learn? Is there any way it can be broken into simpler parts to make it easier to understand… comprehend. I truly wish to learn, respect, and honor the ways of the people our native American flutes derived from.

    Ginger

    I think I am all for simple. This seems pretty straightforward to me already. I dont know how to make it simpler. Maybe, look at your own roots. They maight show you universal truths. This may lead you to other like minds of other Nations. Then, you simply relate with them. I know of no other way.

    #914517

    carlton
    Participant

    For myself, I love Philosophy from different cultures. Over the years I have discovered a common belief, mostly talking about spirit and soul. Reagarding the Native Americans, there is a ton of reading material out there. If you want to read some very interesting stuff, find anything regarding Fools Crow…that will blow your mind.

    #914518

    terry b
    Participant

    My experience was to get to know the history of the area I live in and the history of the tribes involved,what they and others went through a long time ago.It helps to understand the massive changes that have taken place in your area.Also getting to know the history of my family in Canada and how they related to the tribes up there just to give a background to the cultures that were around me and my family.You get to learn what people hold sacred and why.Then I was fortunate to get to know some of the people in the different tribes and their wisdom and struggles on an individual basis.It also helps to attend some events and learn in that way.P.S. when you buy a flute or shaker or any other work of art from someone face to face you can learn a lot about their life and culture from the conversations you have with them.

    #914519

    red hawk
    Participant

    Thank you all for your replies, and sorry my post was somewhat misread. My main goal was to find a way that would make it easier to understand what James writes about “seeing”, “hearing”, etc. as a Native American. I want so much to comprehend what he’s saying but just don’t seem to quite get there. That’s what I meant by respect. I will do some more reading on the subject and see if it will help. And I understand that Native American cultures vary from one location to another but believe there is a common thread that can be all encompassing or basic to all. Maybe I’m wrong in this. I really don’t know, but it’s just a feeling.

    Ginger

    #914520

    wanbli wiwoope
    Participant

    QUOTE(Red Hawk @ Mar 1 2013, 08:19 AM)
    Thank you all for your replies, and sorry my post was somewhat misread. My main goal was to find a way that would make it easier to understand what James writes about “seeing”, “hearing”, etc. as a Native American. I want so much to comprehend what he’s saying but just don’t seem to quite get there. That’s what I meant by respect. I will do some more reading on the subject and see if it will help. And I understand that Native American cultures vary from one location to another but believe there is a common thread that can be all encompassing or basic to all. Maybe I’m wrong in this. I really don’t know, but it’s just a feeling.

    Ginger

    well, I guess when I write “seeing” or “hearing” I just mean to find some common ground of “understanding”. This often seems to be the most lacking. Especially in regards to things such as “Native America” because of the often romanticized and hollywood-ized views. I am just now learning of the Boy Scouts, how they use pseudo “Sioux” ways in their doings. I remember being excluded from cub scouts in elementary, man, I really wanted to be in too, but I couldn’t “understand” why the leader guy looked at me so mean. My mom ended up getting drunk and making a scene at a PTA meeting. lol

    It seems we can find some sorts of nuggets of Truth, or truth or truths together, within this NAF. If we do, I see this can be an extrtemely relevent “thing”. Hey, I don’t mean to knock the Boy Scouts, but I am just learning where much of the “misunderstandings” can arise from.

    #914521

    pastorclyde
    Participant

    QUOTE(LakolSiyotanka @ Mar 1 2013, 09:26 AM)
    well, I guess when I write “seeing” or “hearing” I just mean to find some common ground of “understanding”. This often seems to be the most lacking. Especially in regards to things such as “Native America” because of the often romanticized and hollywood-ized views. I am just now learning of the Boy Scouts, how they use pseudo “Sioux” ways in their doings. I remember being excluded from cub scouts in elementary, man, I really wanted to be in too, but I couldn’t “understand” why the leader guy looked at me so mean. My mom ended up getting drunk and making a scene at a PTA meeting. lol

    It seems we can find some sorts of nuggets of Truth, or truth or truths together, within this NAF. If we do, I see this can be an extrtemely relevent “thing”. Hey, I don’t mean to knock the Boy Scouts, but I am just learning where much of the “misunderstandings” can arise from.
    There is a commonality in being excluded and it happens everywhere for the most part. I have had Jews tell me no one suffered like them through the Holocaust. Yet the Hebrew language is not in any danger of going extinct. Interestingly enough this was along time ago before I really took my Native American heritage to heart. One can look into a community at large and see those who have been excluded and their dreams exploited. I was told by a deceased neighbor who was a teacher that she never thought I would even survive to adulthood. I did so in large part by accepting the fact that it would be in part isolating. Being in part isolated , I find the exchanges with people to be that much more important and find reverence for what makes them what they are. The book the Sirenes of Titan comes to mind. Hands down the biggest commonality we all share is being assimilated into some futuristic melting pot of a cyborg society and that the entire root system of the humanities is modified beyond recognition. Tribal life is in danger of extinction on a global level.

    #914522

    wanbli wiwoope
    Participant

    QUOTE(Pastor Clyde @ Mar 1 2013, 10:23 AM)
    . Hands down the biggest commonality we all share is being assimilated into some futuristic melting pot of a cyborg society

    This Cy Borg, is he any relation to Odell?

    #914523

    wanbli wiwoope
    Participant

    QUOTE(LakolSiyotanka @ Mar 1 2013, 11:23 AM)
    This Cy Borg, is he any relation to Odell?

    that’s just humor there, folks, I aint got a thing against Odell Borg, or High Spirits Flutes. All of them I played, I liked how they played. Could hit any sound I felt like touching, pushing, or pulling. Could play sweet as a kitten too. High Spirits, thems goot floots!

    #914524

    zone1
    Participant

    QUOTE(Pastor Clyde @ Mar 1 2013, 11:23 AM)
    Tribal life is in danger of extinction on a global level.

    So well said….extinction or drastically changed and reformed, world wide. :(
    I find it so sad because you don’t have to be rich to be happy and some of these tribes are rich in happiness and respect for one another…priceless! ;)

    #914525

    pastorclyde
    Participant

    QUOTE(zone1 @ Mar 1 2013, 11:36 AM)
    So well said….extinction or drastically changed and reformed, world wide. :(
    I find it so sad because you don’t have to be rich to be happy and some of these tribes are rich in happiness and respect for one another…priceless! ;)
    More or less Robert Four Star wants to integrate the better aspects of technology with a simpler way to live . He wants kids on the REz to go to University and then to come home. My dad was registered Assiniboine and he did computer research on blackjack and wrote a book in the early 60’s . He was a physical chemist at UCB. I bring this up because according to Robert Four star the NA people who hung around the original Fort Peck and shared information for food were looked down upon by those who did not. Thing is the folks from my specific lines got to mix with some pretty cool Europeans and got good educations in the late 1800’s and learned music and art. So it seems in many ways the Assiniboine have come full circle and integrated themselves into a progressive state to some extent. My dad on the other hand was at a loss culturally speaking in regards to his NA roots. Personally I am not a fan of tribal casinos.

    Note this man’s disposition in regards to only using gifts for beneficial purposes. It seems the Assiniboine in part tried to maintain a level of neutrality in regards to being involved in the Indian wars and the Ghost Dance. At least that is what I have read. They wanted to cooperate with Europeans in order to survive. It seems to me that these folks up there are doing their best to cloak their full sentiments and ways to the public at large and to the US and Canadian Governments. It seems to me most of us who’s sentiments run deep form birth do so as much one way or another. “Civilized ” Man’s ways have been destructive and based on greed since the building of cities and mining for metals to make tools has been around. One of these days the cloak is going to have to come off but for now , I like this persons style.. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XNuDggsFKKI

    #914526

    jackeyj
    Participant
    Red Hawk, post: 113966 wrote:
    This is mainly directed at James, but I thought all of us might benefit from a discussion of this type.

    I would like to continue what I started in another thread. James said that some will hear and others will not. My question is, then it’s impossible for someone like me to learn? Is there any way it can be broken into simpler parts to make it easier to understand… comprehend. I truly wish to learn, respect, and honor the ways of the people our native American flutes derived from.

    To me James is saying its kind of like, understanding ones childhood,your doubts, your struggles, your quite thoughts, how you view the world around you,your personal connection with nature,how you were treated as a person both good or bad, That would be hard maybe to explain to someone who had a completely different background than you, just as you might have a hard time getting another person to understand what you went through maybe in an experience that only you could have the true feelings of its a highly personal, an emotional thing in each case,by extension this could be applied to groups of people an their struggles only unique to them, especially the native Americans an their long history of pain an endurance. In that way i try to understand what they have had to go through an try to look at the natural world around me throught their eyes, playing an making the native amercan flute has really helped Jackeyj

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